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What makes Applied Sport Physiology MSc at Worcester special?

This course prepares students who wish to work in the field of applied sport physiology across a wide spectrum of individuals and environments by developing a deeper understanding of applied sport physiology.  

Using an evidence-based approach you will gain knowledge and skills in applied physiological techniques and be able to optimise and individualise physical conditioning programmes. Students will be offered opportunities to develop their reflective skills, lending themselves to be resilient, intellectually curious and have the skill set to be critically reflective lifelong learners. 

The course offers a significant opportunity to put theory into practice across a range of modules with the placement module specifically developing application of skills to the workplace. The course aligns with the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES) professional competencies for sports physiology so if students are wishing to work towards BASES accreditation, then this course will support your first years of supervised experience and professional development.              

Overview

Overview

Key features

  • Heavy emphasis on the development and application of the applied skills required of a sport physiologist.
  • Course content is aligned to the BASES accreditation professional competencies which supports and prepares students for this professional pathway.
  • Teaching occurs in BASES accredited teaching laboratories and facilities including a Motion & Performance Centre, 2,000-seat sports arena, indoor sports centres, a floodlit 3G astro and synthetic pitch and an exercise physiology suite (BASES accredited).
  • Strong links to professional sports clubs and organisations offering significant opportunities to develop personal and professional skills within the sport science professional sector through the placement module.  
  • Full or part-time study options, with a flexible modular scheme, so that you can study at your own pace including some blended learning (face to face and online learning support).
Entry requirements

Entry requirements

Entry requirements

You will normally have a 2:1 classification in a sport-related degree.

Those who hold a sport-related degree classification of either 2:2 (or below) or a non-sport-related degree will be considered on a case-by-case basis and may be required to submit a portfolio of evidence to demonstrate relevant experience/knowledge.

All applicants shall be interviewed.

International Students

International students require IELTS of 6.5 (with no less than 5.5 in any component) or equivalent.

If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the Admissions Office on 01905 855111 or email pgadmissions@worc.ac.uk for advice.

Course content

Course content

Our courses are informed by research and current developments in the discipline and feedback from students, external examiners and employers. Modules do therefore change periodically in the interests of keeping the course relevant and reflecting best practice. The most up-to-date information will be available to you once you have accepted a place and registered for the course. If there are insufficient numbers of students interested in an optional module, this might not be offered, but we will advise you as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative. 

Applied techniques in Sport Physiology

This module focuses on developing students’ competence in a range of physiological laboratory procedures used by practitioners to profile and monitor athletes’ determinants of performance (15 credits).

Training and monitoring in sport physiology

A key role of the applied sport physiologist is training prescription and monitoring of adaptive responses. This module explores methods of quantifying the ‘dose’ of exercise prescribed, thereby assisting in the optimisation of physical conditioning programmes (15 credits).

Physiological limits to human performance

This module develops understanding of the physiological processes limiting sports performance, thereby allowing identification of appropriate and targeted training interventions (15 credits).

Training and Conditioning for sports performance

This module explores the theoretical underpinnings of the design of physical conditioning programmes. It addresses strength, power, speed and endurance from the perspective of both the individual session and the long term plan (15 credits).

Advanced Research Methods

This module covers advanced statistical analysis and data analysis techniques so that students understand and are independently proficient in techniques that are relevant to sport physiology research and additionally the handling and analysis of large data sets to support individual and team sports performance. Students will also study design methods so that can appreciate published scientific studies to apply to physiology (30 credits).

Professional Placement

This component of the course offers students an opportunity to work within sports physiology to apply knowledge and skills taught on the course (minimum 100 hours placement activity). Students will learn additional knowledge and interpersonal skills from working with clients and applying course content to service users (30 credits).

Sports Research Project

The module gives students the opportunity to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of a current issue or topic within applied sport physiology. In conjunction with their supervisor, the student will design and implement a Masters level research project. This will be supported by appropriate justification, methods, analysis and interpretation of the data obtained during the study. The research findings and conclusions will be discussed in light of relevant contemporary research (60 credits).

An example of the structure which will be followed by a full-time student normally would be:

Semester 1 (September – January)

  • Applied techniques in sport physiology (15 credits)
  • Training and conditioning for sports performance (15 credits)
  • Physiological limits to human performance (15 credits)

 

Semester 2 (January – May)

  • Training and monitoring in sport physiology (15 credits)
  • Professional placement (30 credits)

 

Across Semester 1 and 2 (September – May)

  • Advanced research methods (30 credits)

 

Semester 3 (May – September)

  • Sports research project (60 credits)

 

Part time option

The course will normally take one academic year to complete. Part time students will complete the course over 2 years at least. The maximum registration periods allowed for the completion of these awards in part time mode (without credit on entry) is 6 years.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching and assessment

The University places emphasis on enabling students to develop the independent learning capabilities that will equip you for lifelong learning and future employment, as well as academic achievement.

A mixture of independent study, teaching and academic support from Student Services and Library Services, and also the personal academic tutoring system, will enable you to reflect on progress and build up a profile of skills, achievements and experiences to help you to flourish and be successful.

Teaching

The course will be taught through lectures (face to face and some online content), seminars, laboratory practicals, field-based practicals and interactive workshops. Lectures will be used to communicate key theoretical ideas and concepts, develop critical thinking and then offer opportunities for further discussion and reflection in seminars. The practical sessions will develop practical skills and techniques needed to practice in the field of physiology. Students will gain experience problem solving independently and in group-based settings and will also complete a substantial independent project of their choice through the sports research project. Working in the field within the placement module will strengthen students' employability skills including problem solving, negotiation skills, ability to influence and communicate and collaborate with different organisations.

Preparatory independent work by students will be expected to inform workshops, seminars and practical activities. In addition, meetings with personal academic tutors are scheduled on 3 – 4 occasions per year for the duration of the course.

 The University places emphasis on enabling students to develop independent learning capabilities that will equip individuals for lifelong learning and future employment, as well as academic achievement. A mixture of independent study, teaching and academic support from Student Services and Library Services and use of the Hive. The personal academic tutoring system will enable students to reflect on progress and build up a profile of skills, achievements and experiences that will help them to flourish and be successful.

Contact time

Full time students are expected to study 60 credits per semester and have approximately 12 hours of ‘in-person’ contact time per week. Part time students are expected to study 30 credits per semester and have approximately 6 hours of ‘in-person’ contact time per week.

Typically, class contact time will be structured around:

  • 1 hour lecture
  • 2 hours seminar or practical

Independent self-study

In addition to the contact time, students are expected to undertake around 7.5 hours of personal self-study per module per week. Typically, this will involve online study tasks, reading journal articles and completing formative assignments.

Independent learning is supported by a range of excellent learning facilities, including The Hive and library resources, the virtual learning environment, and extensive electronic learning resources.

Duration

  • 1 year full time 
  • Typically 2 years part-time

Timetables

Timetables are normally available one month before registration. Please note that whilst we try to be as student-friendly as possible, scheduled teaching can take place on any day of the week; and some classes can be scheduled in the evenings.

Assessment

The MSc Applied Sport Physiology aims to develop autonomous, independent and evidence-based practitioners with a detailed knowledge of sport physiology and the ability to apply it to a range of sports or one specific sport (if chosen by the student). There is a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice.

The course provides opportunities to test understanding and learning informally through the completion of practice or ‘formative’ assignments.

Each module has one or more formal or ‘summative’ assessments which are graded and count towards the overall module grade. Assessment methods include a range of coursework assessments such as essays, reports, portfolios, performance, presentations and a final year independent studies project. Some suggested examples are below but these are still to be finalised.

Typically, this could involve:

Semester 1  

  • 1 Practical report file
  • 1 Written athlete report
  • 1 Individual presentation  
  • 1 Unseen examination  

Semester 2

  • 1 Video presentation
  • 1 Placement portfolio  
  • 1 Case study
  • 1 Research proposal presentation  

Semester 3  

  • Research project 

You will receive feedback on practice assessments and on formal assessments undertaken by coursework. Feedback on examination performance is available upon request from the module leader. Feedback is intended to support learning and you are encouraged to discuss it with personal academic tutors and module tutors as appropriate.

We aim to provide you with feedback on formal coursework assessments within 20 working days of hand-in.

Feedback

You will receive feedback on practice assessments and on formal assessments undertaken by coursework. Feedback on examination performance is available upon request from the module leader. Feedback is intended to support learning and you are encouraged to discuss this with personal academic tutors and module tutors as appropriate.

Feedback on formal course work assessments is within 20 working days of hand-in.

Teaching staff

Postgraduate research students who have undertaken teacher training may also contribute to the teaching of seminars under the supervision of the module leader. Teaching is informed by the research and consultancy, and as of Feb 2022, 85% of Sport and Exercise Science lecturers have a higher education teaching qualification or are Fellows of the Higher Education Academy and over 90% have either a teaching qualification or higher education accreditation. You can learn more about the staff by visiting our staff profiles https://www.worcester.ac.uk/about/academic-schools/school-of-sport-and-exercise-science/sport-and-exercise-science-staff-profiles.aspx

Programme specification

For comprehensive details on the aims and intended learning outcomes of the course, and the means by which these are achieved through learning, teaching and assessment, please download the latest programme specification document.

Meet the team

You will be taught by a teaching team whose expertise and knowledge are closely matched to the content of the modules on the course.

Dr Andy Renfree smiling at camera

Dr Andy Renfree

Andy is Principal Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Science and he teaches on subjects related to exercise physiology and interdisciplinary determinants of sport performance. He gained his PhD by using decision-making theory to explain the way in which intensity is regulated during self-paced exercise. A former middle-distance runner, he has won English Junior and Scottish Senior titles over 3000m and 1500m on the track.

dr-jessica-mee

Dr Jessica Mee

Having completed an BSc in Sport Science at the University of Brighton, Jessica undertook a PhD examining heat tolerance and acclimation in female athletes supervised by Dr Neil Maxwell and Professor Jo Doust within the Environmental Extremes Laboratory. Jessica worked as a technical demonstrator and visiting lecturer at the University of Brighton before joining the Extremes Research group at Bangor University as a lecturer in 2015. Dr Jessica Mee is now a Senior Lecturer in Physiology within the School of Sport and Exercise Science. Jessica’s research aims to enhance knowledge of females across the lifespan, living and performing in environmental extremes. Jessica is particularly interested in developing sustainable and accessible heat alleviation strategies that are simple to administer. Jessica’s teaching is strongly influenced by her research activities in environmental and female physiology. Jessica teaches on the BSc Sport and Exercise Science degree and MSc Applied Sports Physiology. Jessica is also accredited in the domains of research, support, and pedagogy by the British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES).

Matt-Cook-2023

Dr Matthew Cook

Hi, I’m Matthew Cook, and I teach Sports nutrition, exercise physiology and research methods here at the University of Worcester. You can usually find me in the exercise physiology laboratory collecting data for sports nutrition experiments, most probably using blackcurrant.

dr-ben-duncan

Dr Ben Duncan

Ben teaches across a range of sport science modules in both exercise and health and sport focused modules. Ben has a particular interest in environmental physiology and endurance performance.

Careers

Careers

The applied nature of the MSc Applied Sport Physiology with the opportunity to complete placement activity will support students seeking employment in the following areas with some opportunities requiring some additional qualifications which can be completed alongside or after this course (e.g. UKSCA, BASES accreditation).

 

Applied physiologists within National Governing Bodies

Sports physiologists with professional teams

Strength and Conditioning Coach

Performance Officer with National Governing Bodies

Performance Director with National Governing Bodies

Personal Trainer

Sport physiology posts within Sport performance Institutes.

The Master's degree will also support students who wish to continue with further academic study and for careers in research (e.g. Research fellow, PhD).

Costs

Fees and funding

Full-time tuition fees

UK and EU students

The standard tuition fee for full-time home and EU students enrolling on MA/MSc/MBA/MRes courses in the academic year 2024/25 is £9,000 per year.

For more details, please visit our course fees page.

International students

The standard tuition fee for full-time international students enrolling on MA/MSc/MBA/MRes courses in the academic year 2024/25 is £17,400 per year.

For more details, please visit our course fees page.

Part-time tuition fees

UK and EU students

The standard tuition fees for part-time home and EU students enrolling on MA/MSc/MBA/MRes/PGCert/PGDip courses in the academic year 2024/25 are £750 per 15-credit module, £1,500 per 30-credit module, £2,250 per 45-credit module, and £3,000 per 60 credit module.

For more details, please visit our course fees page.

International students

The standard tuition fees for part-time international students enrolling on MA/MSc/MBA/MRes courses in the academic year 2024/25 are £1,450 per 15-credit module, £2,900 per 30-credit module, £4,350 per 45-credit module, and £5,800 per 60 credit module.

For more details, please visit our course fees page.

Course-related costs not included in the fees

Every course has day-to-day costs for printing, stationery, books and photocopying.

There will be placements which may incur travel expenses and there will be additional excursions that are not mandatory for the course that you may wish to partake in to consolidate and enhance your learning.

How to apply