Dr Jessica Mee

dr-jessica-mee

Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Science

Academics

Contact Details

email: j.mee@worc.ac.uk
tel: 01905 542826

Jessica is a lecturer in Sport and Exercise Science. Before joining the University in 2019, she held a researcher and lecturer post at Bangor University for 3 years following the completion of her PhD and role as a Technical Instructor at the University of Brighton.

Her area of expertise is in optimising endurance performance for competition in extreme environments with a particular interest in the female athlete. Jessica is a British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) accredited Sport Scientist has a range of experiences working with and preparing national and international level athletes for competition. Jessica was a gymnast in her youth and now regularly attends hot yoga classes.

Qualifications

  • PhD, Heat tolerance and acclimation in female athletes, University of Brighton, 2016.
  • British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) accredited Sport Scientist, 2015.
  • Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA), 2017.
  • Mental Health First Aid, 2017.
  • BSc (Hons) Sport Science (first class), University of Brighton, 2010.
  • Level 2 Women Artistic, General, Freestyle, and GMPD (Gymnastics and Movement for People with Disabilities) gymnastics coach.

Teaching and Research

Teaching expertise

Jessica’s teaching expertise lies in the area of physiology with a specific focus on the additional challenges imposed by extreme environments. Jessica also contributes to the delivery of the gymnastics module for the PE students.

Research

Jessica is an Applied Sport Scientist who has research interests aligned to optimising athlete and occupational workers (including military personnel) for competing and working in hot climates using novel, accessible and effective strategies. She has a particular interest in understanding the additional challenges female endurance athletes may face associated with hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle.

Professional Bodies

BASES (British Association of Sport and Exercise Science)

Physiological Society – Professional Member

Publications

Zurawlew, M.J., Mee, J.A. and Walsh, N.P. (2018). Post-exercise hot water immersion elicits heat acclimation adaptation in endurance trained and recreationally active individuals. Frontiers doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.01824 

Zurawlew, M.J., Mee, J.A. and Walsh, N.P. (2018). Heat Acclimation by Post-Exercise Hot Water Immersion in the Morning Reduces Thermal Strain During Morning and Afternoon Exercise-Heat-Stress. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 13 (10), 1281-1286.

Mee, J.A., Peters, S., Doust, J. and Maxwell, N.S. (2018). Sauna exposure immediately prior to short-term heat acclimation accelerates phenotypic adaptation in females. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 22 (2), 190-195.

Relf, R., Willmott, A., Mee, J., Gibson, O., Saunders, A., Hayes, M. and Maxwell, N. (2018). Females exposed to 24 hours of sleep deprivation do not experience greater physiological strain, but do perceive heat illness symptoms more severely, during exercise-heat stress. Journal of Sport Sciences, 36 (3), 348-355.

Mee, J.A., Gibson, O.R., Tuttle, J.A., Taylor, L., Watt, P.W., Doust, J.H. and Maxwell, N.S. (2016) Leukocyte Hsp72 mRNA transcription does not differ between males and females during heat acclimation. Temperature, 3 (4), 549-556.

Mee, J.A., Gibson, O.R., Doust, J.D. and Maxwell, N.S. (2015). Sex differences in adaptation to short and long term heat acclimation. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 25 (Suppl. 1), 250-258.

Gibson, O.R., Mee, J.A., Tuttle, J.A., Taylor, L., Watt, P.W. and Maxwell, N.S. (2015). Isothermic and fixed intensity heat acclimation methods are similarly effective in heat adaptation following short and long-term timescales. Journal of Thermal Biology 49-50, 55-65.

Gibson, O.R., Mee, J.A., Tuttle, J.A., Taylor, L., Watt, P.W. and Maxwell, N.S. (2015). Isothermic and fixed intensity heat acclimation methods elicit equal increases in Hsp72 mRNA. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 25 (Suppl. 1), 259-268

Mee, J.A., Doust, J. and Maxwell, N.S. (2015). Repeatability of a running heat tolerance test. Journal of Thermal Biology 49-50, 91-97.