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What makes English Literature and Media & Film Studies at Worcester special?

A joint honours in English Literature and Media & Film Studies enables you to critically examine English Literature in some of its immensely varied contexts alongside developing analytical skills attuned to the diverse medium of film.

Studying English Literature at Worcester allows you to develop skills in close and creative reading, theoretical concepts and a critical awareness of the relationship between texts and their contexts.

Media & Film Studies at Worcester introduces you to a wide range of film genres and gives you the ability to understand how we interact, represent our ideas, and tell our stories through a visual medium.

Overview

Overview

Key features

  • Excellent employment potential in careers like advertising, PR and journalism, as well as the film industry
  • Small-class sizes, one-to-one tutorials and robust communication between students and staff
  • Study diverse literatures emanating from the sixteenth through to the twenty-first centuries – and encompassing both ‘canonical’ and ‘marginal’ texts
  • All Media & Film Studies modules are assessed by coursework, not formal examinations
  • Tailor your course to your individual needs with a joint honours degree
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Joint 10th for Graduate Prospects in the UK

Our English courses are joint 10th for Graduate Prospects in the UK (The Complete University Guide 2024.)

Entry requirements

Entry requirements

104
UCAS tariff points

Entry requirements

104 UCAS tariff points

T Levels may be used to meet the entry tariff requirements for this course. Find out more about T levels as UCAS tariff points here.

Other information

If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the Admissions Office on 01905 855111 or email admissions@worc.ac.uk for advice.

Further information about the UCAS Tariff can be obtained from UCAS.

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Course content

Course content

Our courses are informed by research and current developments in the discipline and feedback from students, external examiners and employers. Modules do therefore change periodically in the interests of keeping the course relevant and reflecting best practice. The most up-to-date information will be available to you once you have accepted a place and registered for the course. If there are insufficient numbers of students interested in an optional module, this might not be offered, but we will advise you as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative. 

Year 1

Mandatory

  • Literary Forms and Genres
  • Ways of Reading, Ways of Writing
  • Writing Worcester Past and Present
  • Studying Media & Film
  • Identity, Representation & Diversity
  • Introduction to Film

Year 2

Mandatory

  • Exploring the Canon: Literary Theory and Practice
  • Screen Cultures

Optional

  • Movement and Migration
  • Politics, Sex and Identity in the Early Modern World
  • Shakespeare: Stage, Page and Screen
  • Gothic and Romantic Literature
  • Spaces of Modernity
  • Children’s Literature
  • Work Project
  • Studying Media & Film
  • Contemporary British Cultures
  • Horror
  • Festivals & Celebrations
  • Audio Cultures
  • Work Project
  • Philosophies of Gender & Sexuality
  • Beyond the Mainstream
  • Digital Campaigns

Year 3

Optional

  • Independent Research Project (Dissertation equivalent module)
  • Justice and Revenge: from Tragedy to the Western
  • Postcolonial Encounters
  • Writing and the Environment
  • War and Conflict
  • Gendering Voices
  • Partnerships and Rivalries
  • Literatures and Cultures: International Explorations
  • Queer Bodies, Queer Texts
  • Literature and Culture – Local Heritage
  • Reviewing
  • War, Democracy & the Media
  • Green Media
  • Media Futures
  • Local Cultures
  • Film & Folklore
  • Making Monsters
  • Pornography & Modern Cultures
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Joint Honours

Discover our full range of joint degrees and read about how your degree will be structured.

Find out more about studying a joint honours course
Teaching and assessment

Teaching and assessment

The University places emphasis on enabling students to develop the independent learning capabilities that will equip you for lifelong learning and future employment, as well as academic achievement. A mixture of independent study, teaching and academic support through the personal academic tutoring system enables you to reflect on progress and build up a profile of skills, achievements and experiences that will enable you to flourish.

English Literature teaches through a combination of workshops, lectures, seminars, research trips to cultural locations in the region, and film screenings. Interactive workshops take a variety of formats and are intended to enable the application of learning through discussion and small group activities. Seminars enable the discussion and development of understanding of topics covered in lectures. All modules are supported by the use of the virtual learning environment and other learning technologies.

You will also have the opportunity to gain employability skills through work-based learning. The primary focus of this provision is the year 2 Work Project module where students gain valuable experience of work.

Media & Film Studies will expect you to engage in critical analysis: of the media, of films and the industry and yourself. On the course we seek to understand how and why the media functions as it does and what effects this has on its users and audiences. We also want you to think critically and reflectively about your own culture and experiences, as this will affect how you respond. We will teach you critical concepts and ideas from a variety of theoretical frameworks including black histories, intersectional feminisms and queer approaches, which will enable you to decode the media. We will utilise the research methods of the field including semiotic and discourse analysis.

You will be taught through a combination of interactive lectures, seminars and workshops. You will also have the opportunity to develop your understanding by taking part in class trips such as being able to experience immersion for yourself at a virtual reality gaming arcade and going behind the scenes at a local festival. You will also be invited to our course events which include exclusive film screenings and guest speakers.

For more information about teaching, learning, and assessment on this course, please see the single honours course pages for English Literature and Media & Film Studies.

Programme specification

For comprehensive details on the aims and intended learning outcomes of the course, and the means by which these are achieved through learning, teaching and assessment, please download the latest programme specification documents for English Literature BA (Hons) and Media & Film Studies BA (Hons).

Meet the team

You will be taught by a teaching team whose expertise and knowledge are closely matched to the content of the modules on the course. Every member of the team has a wealth of industry experience, including academics with specialist areas and those who combine teaching with professional practice. There are also demonstrators and technicians.

Teaching is informed by research and consultancy and all permanent staff on the team are Fellows of HEA and have the post grad teaching qualification.

Katy Wareham Morris smiling at camera

Katy Wareham Morris

Katy leads the BA Hons in Media & Culture, a dynamic course which responds to innovations in media forms and applications as well as contemporary cultural issues. Katy is particularly interested in how digital technologies have changed media industries and the way audiences respond to them; and, media futures including immersive media. Katy interrogates media representations created by and representing identities and cultures which have been historically marginalised and challenge the white, middle class, patriarchal tradition. Katy is a proud working class, disabled, female academic and, a published poet.

Dr Lucy Arnold

Dr Lucy Arnold is a specialist in Contemporary literature, with particular research interests in contemporary gothic, narratives of haunting, contemporary women’s writing and psychoanalytic criticism. Her teaching experience spans a wide range of periods and genres but focusses on twentieth and twenty-first century literature. Her published work to date has concerned the writing of Booker Prize winning novelist Hilary Mantel, with her monograph, Reading Hilary Mantel: Haunted Decades, published with Bloomsbury in 2019.

Dr Sharon Young

Dr Sharon Young is a  Fellow of the HEA and her teaching interests include, Renaissance, Restoration and eighteenth-century literature, women's poetry, and literary theory.

Sharon's research focuses mainly on women's poetry of the early modern period, Renaissance revenge tragedy and women's manuscript culture. Sharon has published on female poets and the critical debates of the early eighteenth century and Mary Leapor. 

Dr Mikel Koven

The Film Studies course is led by Dr Mikel J Koven. His teaching areas include World cinema; genre; Hollywood cinema; horror cinema; film & folklore; and cult & exploitation cinema.

His research areas include Film & Folklore (fairy tales, myths, and legends); Exploitation cinema (with a focus on Italian horror film); Jewish cinema (representations, stereotypes, and the Holocaust); and “Cult” TV.  

Professor Nicoleta Cinpoes, Head of English, Media & Culture

Professor Nicoleta Cinpoes

Nicoleta Cinpoes joined the University of Worcester in 2007. She teaches Renaissance Literature, is International Exchanges Liaison for the School of Humanities and co-director of Worcester's Early Modern Research Group.

She has edited Doing Kyd: A Collection of Critical Essays on the Spanish Tragedy for Manchester University Press (2016) and is currently collaborating on a new Romanian translation of Shakespeare's complete works, writing introductions to Hamlet (2010), Titus Andronicus, Measure for Measure, The Merchant of Venice and The Comedy of Errors.

Holly Barnes-Bennetts

Holly Barnes-Bennetts

Holly completed a her BA Hons Media with Cultural Studies at Southampton Solent University in 2006.  After finishing her degree she gained employment ranging from running music and arts festivals, working in PR and charity fundraising. She then returned to teaching, securing a Diploma to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector (University of Warwick) and completing a Masters by Research from Bournemouth University. Currently, Holly is working towards her PhD at the University of Worcester titled: A Digital Interactionist, Praxis Study of Perception and Communication of Positive Sexual Consent.

Barbara Mitra

Dr Barbara Mitra

Dr Barbara Mitra is joint Head of Department (English, Media & Film Studies) and is a Principal Lecturer in Media & Film Studies. She has varied teaching and research interests and has published on issues relating to television, gender, advertising and children, and has become interested in social media, body image and eating disorders. 

Barbara's teaching includes specialist modules on gender and commercial issues of social media and she is also interested in the use of technology in relation to learning and teaching. She has spoken on local radio and schools on issues related to gender and body image, Facebook and television advertising and children. She has also made a number of films on various academic topics.

Barbara welcomes PhD and MRes topics in relation to the broad areas of gender, social media, body images and digital cultures. 

Dr David Arnold, Senior Lecturer in English Literature

Dr David Arnold

David Arnold trained as a Classicist before moving on to doctoral work on twentieth-century American poetry. His research and teaching interests lie in poetry, American literature, ecocriticism and narrative criticism. He has published articles on the literary improvisations of William Carlos Williams and a book on American poetry: Poetry and Language Writing: Objective and Surreal (Liverpool University Press, 2007). His recent work focuses on ecophenomenological readings of modernist writing, and Buddhist American Poetry.

David teaches at undergraduate and postgraduate levels and has responsibility for modules in Literary Theory and American Writing. David is a member of both the British Association of American Studies and the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment. He is also a member of the Green Voices Research Group.

Professor Jean Webb, Professor of International Children's Literature

Professor Jean Webb

Jean Webb is Director of the International Forum for Research in Childrens Literature which provides a focus for literary, cultural and socio-historical scholarly enquiry into writing for children, internationally. She teaches a broad range of undergraduate modules on nineteenth and twentieth century literature, and is responsible for specialist modules in children's literature. She is also an experienced PhD supervisor and examiner.

Careers

Careers

English Literature degree graduates often take a fourth year postgraduate Certificate in Education before entering the teaching profession. Other students will take a certificate in TEFL and become teachers of English as a second language at home or abroad.

Many students progress to careers requiring good communication skills such as Public Relations, or develop research careers with media or publishing companies. Those graduates who achieve particularly good results in their first degree may choose to progress to a Masters course. This then often leads to a career as a researcher or further study to PhD.

Media & Film Studies develops student skills in practice-as-research and research-as-practice for a number of culture and media industries including exhibition, distribution, audience-based marketing, journalism, film education, curating, programming, filmmaking, screenwriting and further academic research.

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Careers and Employability

Our Graduates pursue exciting and diverse careers in a wide variety of employment sectors.

Find out how we can support you to achieve your potential
Costs

Fees and funding

Full-time tuition fees

UK and EU students

The standard fee for full-time home and EU undergraduate students enrolling on BA/BSc/LLB degrees and FdA/FdSc degrees in the 2024/25 academic year is £9,250 per year.

For more details, please visit our course fees page.

International students

The standard tuition fee for full-time international students enrolling on BA/BSc/LLB degrees and FdA/FdSc degrees in the 2024/25 academic year is £16,200 per year.

For more details, please visit our course fees page.

Part-time tuition fees

UK and EU students

The standard tuition fees for part-time UK and EU students enrolling on BA/BSc/LLB degrees and FdA/FdSc degrees in the academic year 2024/25 are £1,156 per 15-credit module, £1,542 per 20-credit module, £2,312 per 30-credit module, £3,083 per 40-credit module, £3,469 per 45-credit module and £4,625 per 60 credit module.

For more details, please visit our course fees page.

Additional costs

Every course has day-to-day costs for basic books, stationery, printing and photocopying. The amounts vary between courses.

If your course offers a placement opportunity, you may need to pay for an Enhanced Disclosure & Barring Service (DBS) check.

Accommodation

Finding the right accommodation is paramount to your university experience. Our halls of residence are home to friendly student communities, making them great places to live and study.

We have over 1,000 rooms across our range of student halls. With rooms to suit every budget and need, from our 'Traditional Hall' at £131 per week to 'En-suite Premium' at £221 per week (2024/25 prices).

For full details visit our accommodation page.

How to apply

How to apply

Applying through UCAS

English Literature and Media & Film Studies BA (Hons) –

UCAS is the central organisation through which applications are processed for entry onto full-time undergraduate courses in Higher Education in the UK.

Read our How to apply pages for more information on applying and to find out what happens to your application.

UCAS Code

QP34

Get in touch

If you have any questions, please get in touch. We’re here to help you every step of the way.

Admissions office

Admissions office

Katy Wareham Morris

Course Leader

Holly Barnes-Bennetts

Admissions Tutor