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Matt Davies

Sports Science Technician

Institute of Sport & Exercise Science

Contact Details

email: matthew.davies@worc.ac.uk

tel: 01905 855256

Matt completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Worcester in 2014.  He is now studying for an MSc in Applied Sport Science and Post Graduate Certificate in Higher Education, also at Worcester.  Matt joined the University in a full time capacity as Sport Science Technician in 2016, based in the Human Performance Laboratories.

Matt coaches Muay Thai, holding black and red prajdet UK ranking and having previously competed in the sport. More recently he has been training and competing as a white belt in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

 Qualifications:

  • BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science, University of Worcester (2014)
  • ISAK Level 1 (2016)
Scope of Role at the University

Scope of Role at the University

Matt's role at the university involves providing technical support to staff and students during teaching sessions.   He is involved in the support and undertaking of a variety of research projects based in the Human Performance Laboratories. Further responsibilities include the day to day maintenance of equipment and consumables in the labs, as well as keeping records and ensuring correct lab procedures are followed.

Internal Responsibilities:

  • Updating COSHH,Health and Safety and Risk Assessment documentation.
  • Preparing the laboratories for research and teaching activities.
  • Calibration, servicing and maintenance of equipment.
  • Supporting practical activities for students and school workshops/open days.
  • Stock control of consumables and lab assets.
  • Providing competency training to staff and students on laboratory equipment.
Industry Background

Industry Background

Prior to attending University of Worcester Matt worked as a Personal Trainer for a number of years with a particular focus on conditioning athletes for racquet sports. This led to attendance at a number of workshops and conferences, where Matt's interest in laboratory research methods was first piqued.