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English Literature and Journalism BA (Hons)

Key features of this course:

  • Strong emphasis on the development of advanced literacy and communication skills
  • Students are taught by experienced, trained and practising journalists and also benefit from an exciting programme of guest lecturers from within the industry
  • A long, established course that has continually evolved with an excellent staff team of highly-skilled and enthusiastic lecturers who are experienced teachers and published researchers
  • Study diverse literatures emanating from the sixteenth through to the twenty-first centuries – and encompassing both ‘canonical’ and ‘marginal’ texts  
  • State-of-the-art facilities, including our new broadcasting suite officially opened by BBC’s Nick Owen in October 2013
  • Excellent work placement opportunities, developed in collaboration with local organisations, including the BBC and opportunities to play an active role in local and regional literature festivals, related events and a work project module


Book an open day

For more information about teaching, learning and assessment on this course, please see the single honours course pages for English Literature and Journalism.

Worcester was the perfect fit for me. The course and study were relevant and really helped in terms of vocational skills. My lecturers and staff at the digital arts centre (DAC) gave me the confidence to give it a go.

Tom El-Shawk, BA Journalism graduate.

Studied as a joint honours degree, these subject areas provide you with exciting opportunities to combine very different types of learning. In tandem with academic study and writing, you will be exploring the practical business of how to research and communicate what’s happening in the world, now.

English Literature provides opportunities to explore literatures from the 16th to 21st centuries, embracing both mainstream, ‘canonical’ and less familiar, ‘marginal’ texts. It invites you to share with your lecturers cutting-edge thinking in spheres as diverse as Shakespeare in translation, children’s literature, contemporary American writing and ecocriticism (the understanding of literary texts through exploration of the interconnections between human culture and organic and animal worlds). From the outset, you will develop skills of close and creative reading, as well as a critical awareness of the relationship between texts and their contexts. Increasingly as the course progresses, you will explore literature from a range of theoretical perspectives current throughout the humanities. This, in turn, will support you to specialise in the areas of literature that interest you most. There are also opportunities to explore relationships between literature and other kinds of expression, for example painting and illustration.

Journalism is vocationally focused and aims to support you to acquire the knowledge and skills that will equip you to work in today’s multi-platform media environment. You are taught by experienced, trained and still practising journalists in state-of-the-art broadcasting facilities (including new radio studios linked to a newsroom and newly refurbished TV studios). There are opportunities for work placements with local media organisations (including the BBC) and a host of guest lectures by high-profile visitors to the course. You are able to tailor your studies to focus on particular aspects of journalism (from sports journalism to political journalism) or to branch out into wider areas of media and communications. Your learning is hand-on, with an emphasis on supporting you to seek journalism and communications roles once you have graduated.

Both of these subject areas enable you to benefit from your lecturers’ cutting edge research - from investigating the political purposes of Hamlet in translation, to exploration of Buddhist American poetry, from perceptions of women newsreaders to the workings and impact of online citizen journalism. If your interest in English literature as part of our human culture of communication past and present is matched by a desire to get involved in the business of communicating today, it’s worth considering this programme. With their mix of practical, hands-on learning and academic study, English Literary Studies and Journalism may be well be an ideal choice for you.

Factfile

Entry requirements

104 UCAS Tariff points

The points above are the new UCAS tariff, which will be used for courses starting from September 2017. See our new UCAS tariff page for more information.

Candidates should have good English Language skills. The IELTS score for international applicants to Joint Honours is 6.0 (with no less than 5.5 in each component). Other English Language qualifications will be considered, for more information please click here.


Study options

Full-time or part-time study available

Get in touch

Claire Wolfe
Course Leader, Journalism
01905 542240
c.wolfe@worc.ac.uk

Dr Tricia Connell
Admissions Tutor, English Literature 
01905 855293
t.connell@worc.ac.uk

Joanne Henderson
Course Administrator
j.henderson@worc.ac.uk
01905 542417 

Admissions Office
01905 855111
admissions@worc.ac.uk

Course content

Year 1

Core modules:

Introduction to Journalism
Journalism Law and Ethics
What is Literature?

 


Module options:

Introduction to Broadcast Journalism
Introduction to Feature Writing
Internet Journalism
Introduction to Photojournalism
English Literature Across the Centuries
English Renaissance Texts and Contexts
Creativity in Women’s Writing: Difference in View
Introduction to American Writing
Power, Sex and Identity in Restoration Literature
Science Fiction: Alternative Worlds
Improving English Usage and Style in Academic Writing


Year 2

Core modules:

Journalism, Law, Ethics and Society
Literary Criticism: Theory and Practice

 


Module options:

Magazine Journalism
Sports Journalism
Reporting Politics (1)
Developing your Media Career
Digital Reporting Techniques
Intermediate Feature Writing
Practical Journalism Skills
Digital Photography
Shakespearean Comedy
Culture and Politics in Victorian Fiction
The Pre-Raphaelites: Word and Image
Children’s Literature
Literary England and the Great War, 1900 – 1930
The American Short Story
Enlightened Minds: Literature 1688 – 1760
Literature in English Around the World


Year 3

Core modules:

N/A

 


Module options:

Reporting Politics (2)
Work Placement
Broadcast Research Skills
Advanced Journalism (Theory and Practice)
Advanced Print Production
Negotiated Project
Live Radio News Production
Live Television News Production
Live New Production (Radio & TV)
Documentary Photography
Green Media
Justice and Revenge in English Renaissance Drama
Love, Religion and Politics in English Renaissance Poetry
Fantasy and the 1980s
Cities and Fiction
American Writing and the Wilderness
Irish Writing since 1900
Literature in Film Adaptation
What Happens Now: Twenty-First Century Poetry Plus
Postcolonial Literature
Independent Research Project
Extended Independent Research Project


Employability

Employability

The Journalism aspect of this ourse will provide you with practical skills to work as a journalist or researcher, or in related communications jobs such as those in public relations. You will be well placed to progress to postgraduate study in journalism or in a wide range of other areas. Students have found employment in the following areas: radio presenting, both local and national, media research, journalism, event organising, media planning, television, theatre, marketing, public relations, campaigns, teaching and further study.

Many English Literature graduates will take a fourth year postgraduate Certificate in Education before entering the teaching profession. Other students will take a certificate in TEFL and become teachers of English as a second language at home or abroad. Many students progress to careers requiring good communication skills such as Public Relations or develop research careers with media or publishing companies.

Throughout the English Literature aspect of the course, there is a focus on developing employability which includes attractive opportunities for work experience, a credited work project module, and a career and professional development module. Students are also strongly encouraged to take up the opportunity to study abroad for a semester.

How to apply

Apply through UCAS

English Literature and Journalism BA (Hons) - QP35

UCAS is the central organisation through which applications are processed for entry onto full-time undergraduate courses in Higher Education in the UK.

Read our How to apply pages for more information on applying and to find out what happens to your application.

How to apply

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