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University of Worcester Hosts Series of Talks at World-Renowned Hay Festival

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A series of talks, exploring mental health, universities in the 21st Century, and the Women’s Institute are set to capture audiences at the hugely popular Hay Festival.

The University of Worcester is delivering a series of four talks at what is widely regarded as one of the world’s top literary festivals.

As part of the University’s 70th anniversary celebrations, the talks are aimed at engaging, inspiring and sharing some of the diverse and important work at Worcester.

The Hay Festival is now in its 29th year and over 10 days in May and June attracts over 250,000 visitors to the small Herefordshire town of Hay-on-Wye.

The University of Worcester series of talks begins on Tuesday, May 31 at 10am with Professor Maggie Andrews on ‘The Acceptable Face of Feminism: 100 Years of the Women’s Institute’. Professor Andrews will explore the political and social initiatives that helped define the radical organisation since the First World War.

Then at 11.30am that day, Professor Jo Smith will deliver a talk entitled ‘The Shape We’re In: Building Good Mental and Emotional Health’. Professor Smith is a consultant clinical psychologist and will explore positive strategies for handling life’s many challenges.

On Wednesday, June 1, at 1pm, Professor David Green, Mick Donovan and Anne Hannaford will host a panel session on ‘Universities in the 21st Century: More and Better?’ They will explore how universities should work for the public good, drawing on the work at Worcester in developing The Hive and the University of Worcester Arena.

The series concludes on Thursday, June 2 at 10am with Professor Lisa Jones and colleagues from the Bipolar Disorder Research Network, who will be discussing our understanding of the condition. The session is titled ‘Exploring the Poles: In Search of a Deeper Understanding of Bipolar Disorder. They will consider factors that can lead to both mania and depression, and examine recent and future advances in the treatment of this mental illness.