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Physical Activity, Health & Wellbeing

Physical Activity, Health & Wellbeing

Chaired by Professor Derek M Peters, research in our cross-institutional research interest group reflects broadly, two key areas.

Firstly, we are concerned with the exploration of the validity and reliability of methods used to estimate physical activity levels in children and adults, in both clinical and non-clinical populations.

Secondly, we seek to further examine the relationship between physical activity (including exercise) and a broad array of parameters under the auspice of ‘health & wellbeing’. Using physical activity as the key parameter, we seek to investigate the impact physical activity & exercise has on health & wellbeing using cross-sectional, intervention and longitudinal research designs in applied settings, from both multi- and inter-disciplinary perspectives and in public health and clinical contexts. To achieve this we are exploring numerous physical activity/inactivity & exercise ‘outcomes’ in a range of clinical and non-clinical populations and across a multitude of disciplines related to physiology, biomedical sciences, psychology, biomechanics, and socio-cultural issues.

Due to the multifaceted nature and interpretation of ‘health & wellbeing’, we have developed strong links with other institutes within the University, particularly in the Institute of Health & Society and the Institute of Science & the Environment, and also a number of external agencies for whom we have undertaken evaluation research e.g. Birmingham Women’s NHS Foundation Trust; Department of Health West Midlands; Dudley Borough Council & Dudley Primary Care Trust; & Wolves Community Trust and Wolverhampton City Primary Care Trust, and external companies with whom we are currently engaged in research e.g. Ergotron Ltd.

We are also engaged in research to examine the ways in which overweight & obesity, as the most commonly identified ‘outcome’ of physical inactivity, are measured in both the field and laboratory and how overweight & obesity is perceived by others, particularly those engaged in physical activity promotion and physical education roles.

Due to the expansive scope of the health & wellbeing ‘outcome’ variables possible to be investigated in their relation to physical activity, the membership of the physical activity, health & wellbeing RIG is fluent and inclusive.

If you are interested in any aspect of our work, if you wish to be involved, or to discuss, engage in, or commission any physical activity, health & wellbeing research or evaluation, please contact Professor Derek M Peters via d.peters@worc.ac.uk or +44 (0) 1905 855352.

RIG Members:

Professor Derek M Peters (Institute of Sport & Exercise Science) is currently researching the impact of sit-stand desks on a number of health & wellbeing outcomes in both laboratory and field-based studies, in association with Ergotron Ltd. Laboratory studies will involve the use of 3D motion capture and force platforms in the Institute’s Motion & Performance Centre to identify the impact of standing desk use on posture, postural sway, balance and a number of desktop ‘accuracy’ tasks. Field-based studies will involve the installation of sit-stand desks to assess their use and impact upon physical activity and a number of other health & wellbeing parameters and measures of job satisfaction & performance. Future studies are also planned with the University staff, students and in other educational settings to investigate the impact of sit-stand desks plus other products/initiatives for increasing standing and reduced sitting in the workplace.

 If your company is interested in taking part in any such research, please email d.peters@worc.ac.uk.

Dr Chris P. Bowers (Worcester Business School): Introducing new technology changes the way people behave. Often there are unintended consequences. Technology driven behaviour change looks to inform the design of our interactions with an aim to direct these behaviour changes in a useful and positive way. In the context of mobile health technologies the use of feedback mechanisms to provide timely and insightful interventions in the form of critical information has demonstrated to be effective in promoting healthy behaviours in some cases. Indeed, many of our health related behaviours become habituated. These kinds of behaviour are robust to traditional mobile health technology interventions. My interest is how we can use technology to observe the formation and existence of these habits and how we might use mobile technology to intervene and ‘break’ existing undesirable/unhealthy habits and perhaps even promote/establish healthy habits, in this context in relation to sedentary behaviour and physical activity respectively.

Dr Simon Evans (Research Lead for the Association for Dementia Studies): It is estimated that 1 million people in the UK will be living with a dementia by 2025, making it a major challenge for individuals, families and society. With a cure for dementia remaining a distant prospect it is also important to consider approaches that focus on prevention and treatment. This has led to increasing recognition of the importance of physical activity. This area is a key interest of the Association for Dementia Studies, a research centre at the University of Worcester. The Association is a multi-professional group of educationalists, researchers and practitioners who are expert in the field of person-centred dementia care and support.  Our mission is to make a substantial contribution to building evidence-based practical ways of working with people living with dementia and their families that enables them to live well.

Dr Andrea Faull is currently leading the Push2Health programme, with Haydn Jarrett, that aims to encourage wheelchair users and those with other physical impairments to become more physically active through combatting barriers to participation such as accessibility, health and safety, lack of awareness, insufficient inclusive sports, lack of help and support and an absence of provision of sport for disabled people once they have left school. Qualitative evaluation of the pilot programme has suggested that the programme is well received and rewarding for participants in a number of areas. For further information on future programmes (the second programme is due to start in summer 2014) or to register your interest, please contact Andrea via a.faull@worc.ac.uk or 01905 855265 and follow the project on Twitter @WorcPush2Health.

Dr Lisa Griffiths is currently working as the Exercise Physiology lead on a collaborative project with the Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust and the South Worcestershire Clinical Commissioning Group. The project entitled ‘Supporting Health and Promoting Exercise (SHAPE)’ aims to help young people with psychosis and bipolar disorder to maintain or lose weight, stop smoking, start exercising and introduce healthier eating to support young people to achieve personal health goals. The project is funded by The Health Foundation – Shine 2014 and is currently being delivered at the University of Worcester’s McClelland Centre.

The SHAPE research team is currently developing the mySHAPE.org.uk website which aims to provide service users, carers and health care providers with accessible information to support the physical health needs of individuals within the mental health service. The website provides practical advice and strategies on managing individual physical health issues and healthy lifestyles as well as course materials for health care professionals to adapt and deliver the SHAPE programme in their service. The SHAPE project has received national recognition as it was a finalist in the Health Service Journal Awards 2015 for the Innovations in Mental Health category and shortlisted for the Positive Practice Award in Mental Health National Award 2016 for Early Intervention in Psychosis.  

Dr Adrian Holliday after recently completing doctoral and post-doctoral research investigating appetite and body composition responses to exercise, is continuing to pursue interests within this field. One forthcoming project, funded through a University of Worcester PhD Studentship and in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Birmingham, will look to optimise exercise bouts for the promotion of short-term energy deficit, by furthering current understanding of post-exercise appetite responses. This research will inform subsequent exercise intervention programmes that will be implemented in weight management strategies. Such strategies will primarily focus on improving the body composition and metabolic health of currently overweight, inactive females within the local population.  Alongside this work, Adrian is currently initiating a collaborative project with colleagues in the Institute of Science and the Environment to address genotypic variants as possible mediators of differing appetite responses to exercise, while also collaborating with researchers at the Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, Aberdeen and the University of Grenada, Spain on various projects associated with enhancing understanding of eating behaviour.

Haydn Jarrett is currently working on a number of projects including leading a service provision/research project in collaboration with the Institute of Health and Society and Worcestershire Acute NHS Trust that is trialling exercise and nutrition interventions with breast cancer survivors; working on an international study with Ball State University (USA) evaluating physical activity questionnaires used in medical settings against activity levels measured by accelerometry; and the Push2Health programme with Dr Andrea Faull. He is also currently researching the validity and reliability of Actigraph accelerometers.

Dr Alex Wadley (Institute of Science & the Environment): Dr Wadley’s research focuses on targeting the intracellular redox environment of acute myeloid leukaemia cells, and pinpointing key protein and gene targets controlling their highly proliferative cell cycle. Alex also has a strong interest in nutritional interventions to modulate cell membrane phospholipid composition and the subsequent impact on cellular oxidative stress. Dr Wadley’s background is in Sport and Exercise Science. Acute exercise can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing subtle changes to the redox environment of active tissues during exercise. Although exercise-induced ROS are linked with a host of beneficial adaptations in health human tissues, these responses are largely unexplored in clinical populations, where high resting levels of ROS can complicate many aspects of the disease. Alex aims to use highly specialised assays to assess intracellular protein thiols, a functional group on certain amino acids that can be reversibly modified by ROS, triggering cellular signalling. This will be coupled with data on the expression and oxidation state of specific thiol-based proteins (i.e. Thioredoxin and Peroxiredoxin) that have recently been shown to increase following acute exercise in humans (Wadley et al, 2015, Free Radical Research, In Press). Investigating how intracellular thiol proteins respond to exercise is essential in facilitating the understanding of the adaptive and potentially harmful roles of exercise-induced ROS in clinical populations.

Funded research & evaluation projects since 2008:

(reverse chronological order)

Supporting Health and Promoting Exercise (SHAPE) project. The Health Foundation – Shine 2014. January 2014, £75,000. Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, University of Worcester’s McClelland Centre. Dr. Lisa Grifftihs, Institute of Health & Society partners: Professor Jo Smith, Professor Eleanor Bradley, Briony Williams, Justine Bold, Dr. Veronica Wilkie.

Vacation Research Assistant scheme award to support data analysis for the school based physical activity intervention. June 2013, £1,000. Dr Lisa Griffiths.

A comparison of physical activity patterns between a school-week and a holiday-week in year five primary schoolchildren. Change 4 Life. June 2012, £5,000. Haydn Jarrett, Sarah Cossar, & Ash Routen.

Evaluation of ‘Wolfie’s Workouts’: a physical activity based health promotion programme launched by the Wolves Community Trust and Wolverhampton City Primary Care Trust. May 2012, £29,498. Dr Lisa Griffiths & Professor Derek M Peters.

Development and analysis of the McClelland Centre healthy lifestyle programme for breast cancer survivors. January 2011. £21,000. Haydn Jarrett & Jane Richardson (Institute of Health & Society).

Evaluation of ‘Patient Preferences for Cardiac Rehabilitation’ in The Heart of Birmingham Teaching Primary Care Trust. October 2009, £94,000. Professor Dominic Upton, Dr Penney Upton, (Institute of Health & Society) & Haydn Jarrett.

Evaluation of Dudley’s Healthy Towns Programme. Dudley Borough Council & Dudley Primary Care Trust. February 2009, £58,500. Professor Derek M Peters & Dr Cheryl Jones (Institute of Science & the Environment)

Evaluation of the Physical Activity Network for the West Midlands. Physical Activity Network for the West Midlands & the Department of Health. June 2009, £5,895. Professor Derek M Peters as invited consultant.

Regional Evaluation of Weight Management Programmes for Children and Families. Birmingham Women’s NHS Foundation Trust. April 2009, £79,835. Professor Dominic Upton, Dr Penney Upton, Justine Bold (Institute of Health & Society) & Professor Derek M Peters.

Supporting Health and Promoting Exercise (SHAPE): Spreading Improvement within Mental Health Services. The Health Foundation – Spreading Improvement: Supporting Dissemination Award. January 2016. £30,000. Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, University of Worcester. Dr. Lisa Griffiths, Briony Williams (Institute of Health & Society).

Research publications since 2008:

(reverse chronological order)

Jarrett, H., Fitzgerald, L., & Routen, A. (In Press) Inter-instrument reliability of the Actigraph GT3X+ ambulatory activity monitor during free-living conditions in adults. Journal of Physical Activity and Health.

Wadley, A.J., Svendsen, I,S., Killer, S. C., & Gleeson, M. (2015). The impact of intensified training with a high or moderate carbohydrate feeding strategy on resting and exercise-induced oxidative stress, European Journal of Applied Physiology (In Press)

Wadley, A.J., Chen, Y.W., Lip, G.Y.H., Fisher, J.P., & Aldred, S. (2015). Low volume-high intensity interval exercise elicits anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in humans, Journal of Sports Sciences (In Press)

Martin, J.A., Ramsay, J., Hughes, C., Peters, D.M. & Edwards, M.G. (2015) Age and Grip Strength Predict Hand Dexterity in Adults. PLoS ONE 10(2):e0117598. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0117598

Wadley, A.J., Fisher, J.P., Lip, G.Y.H., Chen, Y.W., & Aldred, S. (2015). Monitoring changes in Thioredoxin and over-oxidised Peroxiredoxin in response to exercise in humans, Free Radical Research, 4, 1-9.

Wright R.L., Peters, D.M., Robinson, P.D., Watt, T.N. &  Hollands, M.A. (2015) Older adults who have previously fallen due to a trip walk differently than those who have fallen due to a slip. Gait & Posture, 41: 164-169.

Holliday, A., Batey, C., Eves, F.F., & Blannin, A.K. (2014). A novel tool to predict food intake: The Visual Meal Creator. Appetite 79, 68-75

Holliday, A., & Blannin, A.K. (2014). Matching Energy Intake and Energy Expenditure after Isoenergetic Moderate- and High-intensity Exercise. Physiology and Behavior 130, 120-126

Wadley, A.J., Veldhuijzen van Zanten, J.C.C.S., Paine, N.J., Drayson, M.T., & Aldred, S. (2014). Underlying inflammation has no impact on the oxidative stress response to acute mental stress. Brain, Behaviour & Immunity, 40, 182-90.

Wadley, A.J., Veldhuijzen van Zanten, J.C.C.S., Stavropoulos-Kalinoglou, A., Metsios, G., Smith, J., Kitas, G, & Aldred, S. (2014). Three months of moderate-intensity exercise reduced plasma 3-nitrotyrosine levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients, European Journal of Applied Physiology, 114(7), 1483-92.

Paine, N.J., Ring, C., Aldred, A., Bosch, J.A., Wadley, A.J., & Veldhuijzen van Zanten, J.C.C.S. (2013). Eccentric-exercise induced inflammation attenuates the vascular responses to mental stress. Brain, Behaviour and Immunity, 30, 133-142

Routen, A., Edwards, M., Upton, D. & Peters, D.M. (2013) The effect of pedometer step goal, feedback and self-monitoring interventions on accelerometer-measured physical activity in children. Graduate Journal of Sport, Exercise & Physical Education Research, 2: 37-53.

Upton, P, Taylor, C.E., Peters, D.M., Erol, R. & Upton, D. (2013) The effectiveness of local child weight-management programmes: an audit study. Child: Care, Health & Development, 39(1): 125–133. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2214.2012.01378.x.

Griffiths, L.A. & Calver, R. (2013) ‘Wolfie’s Workouts’: Programme Evaluation. Report to Wolves Community Trust.

Holliday, A. & Jeukendrup, A.E. (2012). The metabolic adaptations to endurance training. In I. Mujika (Ed.), Endurance Training – Science and Practice (pp. 141-152). Vitoria-Gasteiz, Basque Country: Iñigo Mujika S.L.U. ISBN 978-84-939970-0-7

Routen, A., Edwards, M., Upton, D. & Peters, D.M. (2012) Discrepancies in accelerometer-measured physical activity in children due to cut-point non-equivalence and placement site. Journal of Sports Sciences, 30(12):1303-10. doi:10.1080/02640414.2012.709266

Wadley, A.J., Veldhuijzen van Zanten, J.J.C.S, & Aldred, S. (2012). The interactions of oxidative stress and inflammation with vascular dysfunction in ageing?: the vascular health triad. American Association of Ageing, 35, 705-718.

Wright, R.L., Peters, D.M., Stitch, A., Robinson, P.D.R., Watt, T. & Hollands, M. (2012) Differences in axial segment reorientation during standing turns predict multiple falls in older adults. Gait & Posture, 36(3): 541-545.

Wright, R.L., Robinson, P.D.R. & Peters, D.M. (2012) Lifetime adherence to physical activity recommendations and fall occurrence in community-dwelling older adults: a retrospective cohort study. Journal of Human Sport & Exercise, 7(1): 310-320. doi:10.4100/jhse.2012.71.09

Jarrett, H., Cossar, S. & Routen, A. (2012) A comparison of physical activity patterns between a school-week and a holiday-week in year five primary schoolchildren. Report to National Change 4 Life project.

Routen, A.C., Upton, D., Edwards, M.G., & Peters, D.M. (2012) Intra- and inter- instrument reliability of the Actiwatch 4 accelerometer in a mechanical laboratory setting. Journal of Human Kinetics, 31, 5-13.

Upton, D., Upton, P. & Jarrett, H. (2012) Evaluation of ‘Patient Preferences for Cardiac Rehabilitation’ in The Heart of Birmingham Teaching Primary Care Trust. Report submitted to HOBtPCT.

Peters, D.M & Jones, C.V. (2011) Dudley Healthy Towns: Programme Evaluation. Report to Dudley Healthy Towns and the Department of Health.

Routen, A., Edwards, M., Upton, D. & Peters, D.M. (2011) The impact of school-day variation in weight and height on National Child Measurement Programme BMI-determined weight category in Year 6 children. Child: Care, Health & Development, 37(3), 360-367. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2214.2010.01204.x.

Upton, D., Upton, P., Bold, J. & Peters, D.M. (2010). Regional Evaluation of Weight Management Programmes for Children and Adults. Report to the Birmingham Women’s NHS Foundation Trust.

Peters, D.M. & Jones, R.J.A. (2010) Perceptions of the physical self of obese children held by future sport, exercise and physical education professionals. Kinesiology: International Journal of Fundamental and Applied Kinesiology, 42(1), 36-43.

Benfield, L.L., Peters, D.M., Fox, K.R., Blake, H., Wenyika, R., & Ness, A.R. (2009). Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) estimation of children’s abdominal adiposity measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). International Journal of Body Composition Research, 7(4), 131–139.

Jones, R.J.A., Polman, R.C.J. & Peters, D.M. (2009). Physical self-perceptions of adolescents in years 8, 9 and 10 in independent schools, state comprehensive schools and specialist sport colleges in England. Physical Education & Sport Pedagogy, 14(2), 109-124.

Benfield, L., Fox. K.R., Peters, D.M., Blake, H., Rogers, I., Grant, C. & Ness, A. (2008). Magnetic resonance imaging of abdominal adiposity in a large cohort of British children. International Journal of Obesity, 32, 91-99.

Research conference presentations:

(reverse chronological order)

Wadley, A.J., Chen, Y.W., Bennett, S.J., Lip, G.Y.H., Turner, J.E., Fisher, J.P., & Aldred, S. (2015). High intensity exercise transiently increased over-oxidised Peroxiredoxin and Thioredoxin protein expression in humans. Metabolic Drivers of Immunity, Aston, Birmingham, UK.

Campbell, J.P., Turner, J.E., Bosch, J.A., Wadley, A.J, Drayson, M.T., and Aldred. S. (2014).  Exercise mobilises skin-homing effector CD8+ T cells and natural killer cells into peripheral blood.  International Society of Exercise Immunology, Newcastle, Australia

Wadley, A.J., Fisher, J.P., Lip, G.Y.H., Chen, Y.W., & Aldred, S. (2014). Thioredoxin and over-oxidised peroxiredoxin are increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells during exercise in humans, Redox regulation in health and disease: a 50 year history. Biochemistry Society, Edinburgh, UK.

Wadley, A.J., Fisher, J.P., Lip, G.Y.H., Chen, Y.W., & Aldred, S. (2014). Comparison of LV-HIIT and steady state exercise bouts on oxidative stress and inflammation in humans. Role of inflammation in exercise, health and disease. American College of Sports Medicine, Orlando, Florida, US

Wright R.L., Peters, D.M., Robinson, P.D., Watt, T.N. & Hollands, M.A (2014). Differences between older adult ""slippers"" and ""trippers"" in measures of dynamic balance during walking. International Society for Posture & Gait Research World Congress, Vancouver, Canada, 29th June – 3rd July.

Jarrett, H., Ozemek, C., Fitzgerald, L. & Kaminsky, L.A. (2014). Comparison of moderate to vigorous physical activity assessed by accelerometry and the GPPAQ. American College of Sports Medicine 61st Annual Meeting, 5th World Congress on Exercise is Medicine, and World Congress on the Role of Inflammation in Exercise, Health and Disease. Orlando, USA, 29th-31st May.

Weaver. A., Fitzgerald. L., Jarrett. H., Ozemek. C., & Kaminsky. L.A. (2014). Different accelerometry interpretation methods alter physical activity classifications. American College of Sports Medicine 61st Annual Meeting, 5th World Congress on Exercise is Medicine, and World Congress on the Role of Inflammation in Exercise, Health and Disease. Orlando, USA, 29th-31st May.

Ozemek. C., Fitzgerald. L., Jarrett. H. & Kaminsky. L.A. (2014). Comparison of moderate to vigorous physical activity assessed by accelerometry and the EVS. American College of Sports Medicine 61st Annual Meeting, 5th World Congress on Exercise is Medicine, and World Congress on the Role of Inflammation in Exercise, Health and Disease, Orlando, USA, 29th-31st May.

Conway.K.C., Fitzgerald. L., Jarrett. H. Ozemek. C. & Kaminsky. L.A. (2014). Meeting physical activity guidelines does not result in less sedentary time. American College of Sports Medicine 61st Annual Meeting, 5th World Congress on Exercise is Medicine, and World Congress on the Role of Inflammation in Exercise, Health and Disease. Orlando, USA, 29th-31st May.

Holliday, A., & Blannin, A.K. (2013). Matching energy intake and energy expenditure after isoenergetic moderate- and high-intensity exercise. European College of Sport Science Congress, Barcelona, Spain

Wadley, A.J., Fisher, J.P., Chen, Y.W., & Aldred, S. (2013). Low volume high intensity interval and steady state exercise bouts elicit similar alterations in plasma markers of oxidative stress. 18th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport & Exercise Science, Barcelona, Spain.

Routen, A.C., Upton, D., Edwards, M.G., & Peters, D.M. (2011). Intra-and inter-instrument reliability of the Actiwatch 4 accelerometer in a mechanical laboratory setting. 16th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Liverpool John Moores University, UK, 6th-9th July.

Routen, A.C., Upton, D., Edwards, M.G., & Peters, D.M. (2011). Accelerometer measured physical activity differs between wrist and hip placement sites in children aged 10-11 years. 16th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Liverpool John Moores University, UK, 6th-9th July.

Rowe, R.E. & Peters, D.M. (2011). A comparison of time in health enhancing physical activity intensities during a school day assessed using two methods in 11 to 16 year old children. BASES Annual Student Conference, Integrations and Innovations: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Sport and Exercise Science, University of Chester, UK, 12-13th April.

Holliday, A., Higgs, S., & Jeukendrup, A.E. (2011). The effect of exercise intensity of subjective appetite, food intake and satiety peptides in highly-trained male endurance athletes. American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting, Denver, USA

Benfield L., Sattar N., Peters D.M., Fox K.R. & Lawlor, D.A. (2010). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) determined childhood abdominal adiposity and its association with subsequent cardiovascular risk factors in adolescence: Prospective cohort study. 5th Conference of Epidemiological Longitudinal Studies in Europe, Paphos, Cyprus, 13-15th October.

Watts, H., Francis-Smythe, J., Peters, D.M. & Upton, D. (2010). Encouraging employees use of fitness clubs in employee wellness programs. 2nd Biennial IWP Conference on Work, Well-Being and Performance, Institute of Work Psychology, University of Sheffield, UK, June 29th-1st July.

Benfield L., Fox K.R., Peters D.M., Ness, A. & Lawlor, D.A. (2010). Association between magnetic resonance image (MRI) assessed abdominal adiposity, objectively measured physical activity (PA) in ALSPAC cohort children age 11-13y. Cohorts Collaboration Meeting, Oslo, Norway, 15-17th June.

Edwards, M.G., Martin, J.A., Ramsey, J., Hughes, C. & Peters, D.M. (2010). The relationships between age, strength and movement dexterity. 8th SEPEX Conference, Granada, Spain, 15-17th April.

Peters, D.M. & Jones, C. (2010) ‘Out of sight out of mind’: the relationship between distance and walk-time perceptions and urban park visit regularity in Dudley Borough. Research Focus: Culture, Media, Sport & Tourism Conference, University of Worcester, 24th March.

Benfield, L.L., Fox, K.R., Peters, D.M., Northstone, K., Emmett, P., Wenyika, R., Ness, A.R. & Newby, P.K. (2010). MRI determined abdominal adiposity changes in a cohort of British children between 11 and 13 years of age. 1st International Congress on Abdominal Obesity, Hong Kong, China, 28-30th January.

Edwards, M.G., Martin, J.A., Hughes, C. & Peters, D.M. (2009). Effects of ageing and selective attention on movement speed. 4th International Conference on Spatial Cognition, Rome, Italy, 14-18th Sept.

Routen, A., Upton, D., Edwards, M. & Peters, D.M. (2009). A preliminary investigation of child, parent and programme leader reflections on participation in and delivery of a family-based weight intervention programme. BASES Annual Conference, Leeds, 2nd Sept.

Wright, R.L, Peters, D.M., Robinson, P.D., Watt, T.N. & Hollands, M.A. (2009). Age and falls history-related differences in the biomechanics of 360º pivot turns. International Society for Posture and Gait Research, Bologna, Italy, 21st-25th June.

Routen, A., Upton, D., Edwards, M. & Peters, D.M. (2009). A preliminary investigation of child, parent and programme leader reflections on participation in and delivery of a family-based weight intervention programme. University of Birmingham Obesity & Insulin Resistance Day Conference, 24th April.

Martin, J.A., Peters, D.M., Hughes, C. & Edwards, M.G. (2008). Determinants of motor performance across the age span. Federation of the European Societies of Neuropsychology, Edinburgh University 2nd-5th Sept.

Benfield, L.L., Fox, K.R., Peters, D.M., Blake, H., Rogers, I., Grant, C., Ness, A. (2008) Relationships between magnetic resonance image (MRI) determined abdominal adiposity, physical activity and dietary variables in a cohort of 11-13 year olds. 8th International Symposium on in vivo Body Composition Studies, New York, USA, 9th-12th July.

Craig, B., Hughes, C.J., Bevins, J. & Peters, D.M. (2008). Quantification of skeletal movement during whole body vibration in standing and squatting positions. National Strength & Conditioning Association National Conference & Exhibition, Las Vegas, USA, 9th-12th July.

Benfield, L.L., Peters, D.M., Fox, K.R., Blake, H., Rogers, I., Grant, C., Ness, A. (2008). Validity of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry for the estimation of MRI-assessed abdominal adiposity in children. The 16th European Congress on Obesity, Geneva, Switzerland, 14-17th May.

Postgraduate research student completions:

(reverse chronological order)

Ashley Routen PhD (July 2013) – Body mass index & accelerometer measurement considerations for use in the evaluation of pedometer-based physical activity interventions in children. University of Worcester. Professor Derek M Peters, Dr Martin Edwards (University of Birmingham), & Professor Dominic Upton (Institute of Health & Society).

Rachel Wright PhD (Sept 2009) - Implications for falls prevention of lifetime physical activity and control of gait, posture and balance in older adults. University of Worcester/Coventry. Professor Derek M Peters, Professor Paul Robinson & Dr Mark Hollands (University of Birmingham)..

Jason Martin PhD (Oct 2009) - The effects of aging on movement performance. University of Birmingham. Dr Martin Edwards (University of Birmingham), Chris Hughes & Professor Derek M Peters.