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Clare Perkins

Research Student

Institute of Science & the Environment

Contact Details

email: clare.perkins@worc.ac.uk

tel:

Supervisors
Dr Nick Evans, University of Worcester
Dr Carol Morris, University of Nottingham

Qualifications
MA Social Anthropology, University of Wales, Lampeter
BA Religious Studies and Anthropology, University of Wales, Lampeter

Teaching & Research

Teaching & Research

Teaching
Module Tutor (GEOG1002: Mapping the Environment)

Research Interests 
  
Science and technology within the UK agricultural sector
Agricultural geography
UK farm families
Constituted ‘marginality’
Interdisciplinarity (specifically between geography and anthropology)
Anthropological methods and ethnography
Discourses of globalisation / productivism 
Science and technology within the UK agricultural sector

Research

Before joining the University of Worcester, my research focused on the interactions at a Welsh, city-based farmers’ market as a way of exploring the interplay between the agricultural sector and processes associated with globalisation. Seeking to understand the reasons behind farmers’ markets, I theorised legislation and policy; food and globalisation; supermarket ‘culture’; and the (re-) shaping of communities.

My current PhD research is an exploration of inter-relationships between farm families and technologies, such as genetic modification (GM). Through long-term, multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork, I will consider the processes that surround policy, scientific innovation and media representation within contemporary UK agriculture.

 

Professional Bodies

Professional Bodies

Postgraduate Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)

The European Association of Social Anthropologists 

External Responsibilities

External Responsibilities

Occasional Reviewer, Anthropology Reviews: Dissent and Cultural Politics.

Anthropology Reference Group Member, The Higher Education Academy, Centre for Sociology, Anthropology and Politics (C-SAP).

Publications & Conferences

Publications & Conferences

Publications  
Perkins, C (2010); The Husbandry of Technology: Outlining an ethnographic approach to farm family (neo-) productions of genetic modification, Anthropology Reviews: Dissent and Cultural Politics 1, 36-38.

Perkins, C (Forthcoming); Keeping Friends Close, but Enemies Closer: Theoretical and Methodological Negotiations of Dominant Invisibility within Fieldwork at a City Farmers’ Market, Learning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences, UK: Berghahn.

Perkins, C. (Forthcoming) 'Neo-productivism', farm families and technologies in Dundee, Scotland, UK. In Harakova, H., Boscoboinink, A. (eds.) From production to consumption: Transformation of rural communities in Europe, Lit Verlag, München, Germany

Perkins, C. (Under Review) The Husbandry of Technology: Farm families' cultivation of technological knowledge under 'neo-productivist' conditions. In Ramsey, D., Evans, N. (eds.) Rural Development: Theories and Applications, Rural Development Institute, Brandon University, Manitoba, Canada

Conference Papers, Workshops and Presentations
Mama’s hotpot: Leaving behind Tesco’s Best of British for a taste of the dirt (Departmental Research Seminar, University of Wales, Lampeter, UK, 19th May 2008).

Mama’s hotpot: Leaving behind Tesco’s Best of British for a taste of the dirt (TAG (Theoretical Archaeology Group), Columbia University, New York, USA, 24th May 2008).

New Age Shepherd’s Pie: Food sustenance for the wise (Poster Presentation, BSA (British Sociological Association) Food Study Group, British Library, London, UK, 14th July 2008).

Jamie’s School Dinners: The anthropology of food (Wales Anthropology Day Workshop, University of Wales, Lampeter, UK, 27th June 2008).

‘We are what we eat’: Exploring counter-cultural re-constructions of culinary consent (Interrogating Consent and Dominance: Citizenship, Ethnicities and Sexualities in Research and Teaching, Gregynog Conference Hall, Powys, UK, 10th September 2008).

Call of the wild: The ‘Alternative’ Answer (TAG (Theoretical Archaeology Group), Southampton University, UK, 15-17th December 2008).

There’s a time and a place for everything, but maybe not this: a re-think of migrants, food and cultural identity (Food and Migration Workshop, SOAS (School of Oriental and Asian Studies), University of London, UK, 2-3rd February 2009).

Keeping Friends Close, but Enemies Closer: Internalised dominance at a Cardiff farmers’ market (Interrogating Consent and Dominance: Citizenship, Ethnicities and Sexualities in Research and Teaching, Gregynog Conference Hall, Powys, UK, 9th February 2009).

Keeping Friends Close, but Enemies Closer: Theoretical and methodological negotiations of dominant invisibility within fieldwork at a city farmers' market (ASA 2009 ‘Anthropological and Archaeological Imaginations: Past, Present and Future’ Bristol, UK, 6-9th April 2009).

Hybridity and Husbandry: Farm Families and Genetic Modification in the UK (CCRI Winter School, Hawkwood College, Stroud, UK, 11-12th November, 2009).

The Husbandry of Technology: An ethnographic approach to ‘radical’ engagements with a changing global context by UK farm families (Research Student Conference, University of Worcester, 8th May 2010).

The Husbandry of Technology: An ethnographic approach to understanding the relationship between ‘radical’ technologies and UK farm family businesses (Postgraduate Research Student Conference, University of Gloucestershire, 10th-11th May, 2010).

The Husbandry of Technology: Outlining an ethnographic approach to farm family (neo-) productions of 'radical' technologies (Anglo-French-Irish Rural Geography Symposium, Farming for a Sustainable Countryside, University of Colchester, 12-15th July 2010).

The Husbandry of Technology: Ethnographically understanding changing agricultural engagements by UK farm families (European Association of Social Anthropologists Biennial Conference, National University of Ireland Maynooth, 24th - 27th August, 2010)

The Husbandry of Technology: ‘Radical’ technologies within the everyday context of the UK family farm (Vital Signs 2: Engaging Research Imaginations, University of Manchester, 7th - 9th September, 2010)

Seeking an ethnography of agriculture: From market to farm, label to lab, anthropology to geography, ISE Research Seminar Series, University of Worcester, 21st October 2010

(Field) Methods and (Farm) Gatekeepers: Open Publishing, internet blogging and volunteering? Postgraduate Work in Progress Seminar Series, University of Worcester, 10th February 2011

The Husbandry of Technology: Cultivation of technological knowledge under neo-productivist conditions, Anglo-American-Canadian Quadriennial Rural Geography Conference, 2011

Beth am gael paned? / What about a cup of tea then?, Postgraduate Work in Progress Seminar Series, University of Worcester, 12th December 2011