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English Language and Journalism BA (Hons)

Key features of this course:

  • State-of-the-art facilities, including our new broadcasting suite officially opened by BBC’s Nick Owen in October 2013
  • Excellent work placement opportunities, developed in collaboration with local organisations, including the BBC
  • Students are taught by experienced, trained and practising journalists and also benefit from an exciting programme of guest lecturers from within the industry
  • The course is dynamic and innovative, with highly enthusiastic teaching informed by contemporary research
  • Clear focus on the socio-cultural aspects of language use and an emphasis on the development of research skills with opportunities to present research outcomes through a student conference in the final year


Book an open day

For more information about teaching, learning and assessment on this course, please see the single honours course pages for English Language and Journalism.

Worcester was the perfect fit for me. The course and study were relevant and really helped in terms of vocational skills. My lecturers and staff at the digital arts centre (DAC) gave me the confidence to give it a go.

Tom El-Shawk, BA Journalism graduate.

Scope of the course content meant that I could research and write in a wide variety of areas, sometimes crossing into other disciplines such as Sociology. This kept the process of studying fresh and interesting.

Josh Crampton, BA (Hons) English Language Joint Honours graduate.

Both of these subject areas broadly address communication, contemporary society and culture. Studied as Joint Honours, they provide you with exciting opportunities to combine very different types of learning. In tandem with academic study and writing, you will be exploring the practical business of how to research and communicate what’s happening in the world, now.

In English Language your critical and intellectual faculties are honed in a variety of teaching and learning contexts. You focus on the socio-cultural aspects of language use and exploration of linguistic and stylistic choices. By your third year you will be carrying out your own independent research projects on aspects of English language as it is used in spoken and written communication   – communication central to the construction of human beings’ identities, and that is as varied, diverse and rich as are its speakers and writers. During the course, there are opportunities for you to undertake work placements, supporting you to recognise and apply the very broad range of transferable skills and competencies that you are developing.

Journalism is vocationally focused and aims to support you to acquire the knowledge and skills that will equip you to work in today’s multi-platform media environment. You are taught by experienced, trained and still practising journalists in state-of-the-art broadcasting facilities (including new radio studios linked to a newsroom and newly refurbished TV studios). There are opportunities for work placements with local media organisations (including the BBC) and a host of guest lectures by high-profile visitors to the course. You are able to tailor your studies to focus on particular aspects of journalism (from sports journalism to political journalism) or to branch out into wider areas of media and communications. Your learning is hand-on, with an emphasis on supporting you to seek journalism and communications roles once you have graduated.

English Language Studies and Journalism in combination will be for you if your interests lie in the ways in which human beings communicate with one another, how they make sense of their society and cultures, and how communication itself shapes the meanings and ideologies of our ever changing world.

Factfile

Entry requirements

104 UCAS Tariff points

The points above are the new UCAS tariff, which will be used for courses starting from September 2017. See our new UCAS tariff page for more information.

Candidates should have good English Language skills. The IELTS score for international applicants to Joint Honours is 6.0 (with no less than 5.5 in each component). Other English Language qualifications will be considered, for more information please click here.


Study options

Full-time or part-time study available.

Get in touch

Claire Wolfe
Course Leader, Journalism
01905 542240
c.wolfe@worc.ac.uk

Dr Tricia Connell
Admissions Tutor, English Language Studies
01905 855293
t.connell@worc.ac.uk 

Admissions Office
01905 855111
admissions@worc.ac.uk

Course content

Year 1

Core modules:

Introduction to Journalism
Journalism Law and Ethics
Describing English

 


Module options:

Introduction to Broadcast Journalism
Introduction to Feature Writing
Internet Journalism
Introduction to Photojournalism
The History of the English Language
Name Studies
Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Introduction to Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL)
Improving English Usage and Style in Academic Writing
French Stage 1
German Stage 1
Spanish Stage 1
Japanese Stage 1
Italian Stage 1
Chinese Mandarin Stage 1


Year 2

Core modules:

Journalism, Law, Ethics and Society
Approaches to English Language Studies: Critical and Theoretical Matters

 


Module options:

Magazine Journalism
Sports Journalism
Reporting Politics (1)
Developing your Media Career
Digital Reporting Techniques
Intermediate Feature Writing
Practical Journalism Skills
Digital Photography
Language and Power
The English Language in the 21st Century
Research Language Variation
Language Awareness and Analysis in Teaching English as a Foreign Language


Year 3

Core modules:

N/A

 


Module options:

Reporting Politics (2)
Work Placement
Broadcast Research Skills
Advanced Journalism (Theory and Practice)
Advanced Print Production
Negotiated Project
Live Radio News Production
Live Television News Production
Live New Production (Radio & TV)
Documentary Photography
Green Media
World Englishes
Multilingualism Matters
Language, Style & Identity
Introduction to Language Acquisition
Independent Research Project
Work Project Module
Key Concepts and Principles in Teaching English as a Foreign Language - Methodology


Employability

Employability

The Journalism aspect of this course will provide you with practical skills to work as a journalist or researcher, or in related communications jobs such as those in public relations. You will be well placed to progress to postgraduate study in journalism or in a wide range of other areas. Students have found employment in the following areas: radio presenting, both local and national, media research, journalism, event organising, media planning, television, theatre, marketing, public relations, campaigns, teaching and further study.

Many graduates of English Language Studies courses will take a postgraduate education course as a fourth year of study and enter the teaching profession. Others will find that the skills acquired through the study of English are particularly highly regarded in all professions where good communication skills are prized such as publishing, journalism, public relations, human resources and web-based communication. English Language Studies provides continuous opportunities to develop employability skills and includes work experience options. There is a range of opportunities to study for a semester abroad in Europe and the USA in the second semester of the second year. 

How to apply

Apply through UCAS

English Language Studies and Journalism BA (Hons) - PQ53

UCAS is the central organisation through which applications are processed for entry onto full-time undergraduate courses in Higher Education in the UK.

Read our How to apply pages for more information on applying and to find out what happens to your application.

How to apply

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